Explore the history of your favourite games with titles from Boss Fight Books

Explore the history of your favourite games with titles from Boss Fight Books

Books on the history and criticism of video games are a rare thing. Granted, the situation has been improving in the past few years, but for a long time the study of video games was, at best, fragmentary, or, at worst, little better than trivia. Sure, there are art books that explore the composition of video games, but where are the titles that expand on the development and significance of your favourite game? It’s been the better part of half a century since video games became a household staple, so it’s about time someone steps up to give the medium the cultural grounding it deserves.

Boss Fight Books, however, seeks to change that with their series of books concerning video games regarded as classical or significant to the field. Since 2013 they have contributed a badly need source of information for gamers revisiting old favourites or discovering long beloved titles for the first time.

Some books focus on the history of the game’s creation, some focus on particular elements like level design, story, and music, some investigate the subculture that has formed around a game, and some reflect on the game’s role in the author’s own life.
Each book is written by a different author from in or out of the video game industry. We work with game designers, game journalists, novelists, voice actors, film critics, musicians, and artists. Most of the time, a book’s subject is chosen by the author because they are passionate and curious about the game.

Boss Fight Books official webpage

The games examined stretch back from NES and SNES classics such as Earthbound, more contemporary games such as Silent Hill 2 and Red Dead Redemption, undisputed legends like Baldur’s Gate and Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic; as well as oddball examples such as the sophomoric Postal or the questionably legitimate Christian-themed NES game Bible Adventures.

Books are available in snazzy minimalist covers, either individual or in bundles if you’re hard up for reading this winter, or have a die hard gamer that you can’t think of a present for this holiday season.

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